Jet Fuel

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Gevo has been producing and selling its patented alcohol-to-jet fuel (ATJ) derived from isobutanol since 2011. Gevo is working toward further commercializing its patented ATJ, which is a clean burning, homegrown, drop-in jet fuel that has the potential to deliver aviation biofuels at scale and at competitive cost. Fossil-based jet fuel is one of the largest expenses for airlines. Gevo’s ATJ is expected to help reduce the airline industry’s carbon footprint and help control fuel costs.

Before Gevo’s ATJ could be sold to airlines, it had to pass a series of technical and safety tests. After six years of rigorous performance assessments conducted by ASTM International, including extensive engine testing and data analysis by all of the major original equipment manufacturers, the ASTM D7566 specification was revised to include Gevo’s ATJ in April of 2016. The revision includes ATJ derived from renewable isobutanol, regardless of the carbohydrate feedstock (i.e. cellulosics, corn, sugar cane, molasses, etc.). For more on Alaska Airlines flying with Gevo’s cellulosic renewable ATJ click here for a PDF download.

Gevo’s ATJ can now be seamlessly integrated into the existing distribution infrastructure and onto commercial aircraft where a domestic, competitively priced, sustainable supply of biofuels is expected to meet the growing demand for fuel alternatives in one of the world’s largest industries for fuel consumption.

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Gevo is working closely with commercial airlines, the Air Transport Association of America, the U.S. Department of Defense and other organizations in a strategic effort to develop the biojet industry. To date, Gevo’s ATJ has been produced at its demo biorefinery in Silsbee, Texas, using isobutanol produced at its Luverne, Minn. fermentation facility. Successful test flights using Gevo’s ATJ have been flown with Alaska Airlines, the U.S. Air Force, U.S. Army and U.S. Navy.